Maren Morris Still Gets Nervous For Performances


Maren Morris recently announced her new album Humble Quest to come out on March 25th. She stopped by The Bobby Bones Show to talk about the new project and share some recent stories.

Jimmy Robbins, a known songwriter in Nashville was with Morris to play guitar for her performance. He shared that Morris is a "treat to write with." Morris usually goes into a write with an idea of what she wants to do. But noted his most favorite part of their writes is when Morris sings the demo vocal. He loves watching the song come to life. Robbins has written songs like "Half of My Hometown," "Sure Be Cool If You Did," and "Beachin'" to name a few. He's also written several of Morris' songs with her including "The Bones" and "I Could Use A Love Song." Morris believes they haven't written a bad song together.

Despite being a massive star, Morris admitted she definitely still gets nervous. She recalled her Saturday Night Live performance when she sang her song "80s Mercedes." There was a moment during her performance where she forgot all of her lyrics, but thankfully they came back quickly so no one noticed. Another moment she had nerves was the Houston Rodeo when she was 9 months pregnant. That was the last performance that really evoked anxiety for her. She was worried about giving birth on stage, especially because the stage was rotating. She had a doctor's note to attend, and did bring her doula with her in case, but they did not stay the night in Houston because of her pregnancy. Looking back on the performance now, Morris said she's glad she made it happen because the photos still make her cry and laugh. She's excited to do it again this year because she feels it's a right of passage as a Texan.

In only a few weeks, fans will finally be able to hear Morris' new project Humble Quest. The title of the album to Morris means the journey of her getting back to her roots. She felt it was applicable to the world. Morris wanted to create something that was positive and made people feel good, she didn't want to "inject more sad songs to society." She instead wanted this project to be about putting songs into the world that would alleviate that.


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